Respect for Life

Severely disabled urge Canadian Parliament to protect the vulnerable

‘I’ve gone to the hospital because of illness, and medical staff questioned whether extreme measures were worth it,' James Schutten told a Parliamentary committee.

‘I’ve gone to the hospital because of illness, and medical staff questioned whether extreme measures were worth it,’ James Schutten told a Parliamentary committee.

OTTAWA, May 10, 2016 (Lianne Laurence for LifeSiteNews) — Twenty-one-year-old James Schutten volunteers at a nursing home a few days a week and helps out at an elementary school.

But he also requires “someone to set up my feeding tube, suction my trach, turn me over in bed, take me to the bathroom, and scratch my head,” he told the House of Commons justice committee last week.

“I’m not telling you this to make you feel sorry for me. I don’t feel sorry for myself,” added Schutten, who at age two was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy, a degenerative neuromuscular disorder that affects motor muscles and weakens the respiratory system.

“But you need to know that these professionals and family members need to care about my life and whether I live or die.”

The House justice committee heard public testimony on suggested amendments to the Liberals’ controversial euthanasia law last week, and Monday evening began its clause-by-clause study of Bill C-14, which passed second reading May 4.

The bill is intended to amend the Criminal Code to conform with the Supreme Court’s February 2015 Carter decision, which struck down the prohibition against assisted suicide and euthanasia as unconstitutional, and takes effect June 6.

Schutten, who voiced his worries about Bill C-14 on behalf of the Association of Reformed Political Action Canada (ARPA), said that he’s “gone to the hospital because of illness, and medical staff questioned whether extreme measures were worth it.”

“This makes me very nervous because I feel like I’m not worth the trouble. Thankfully, my family has my back to speak with the doctors on my behalf,” he said.

“I have anxiety now. How much more if Bill C-14 comes into effect?”


“With this right to die, it makes me feel like
society thinks I should choose to die.”


Schutten asked the committee to amend Bill C-14 to require “that palliative care is meaningfully made available to the patient.”

“I’m one of those people who the Supreme Court of Canada thinks should have this right to doctor-assisted death,” he noted. And “with this right to die, it makes me feel like society thinks I should choose to die.”

“But what if instead I had the right to palliative care or resources to help me continue to be a productive member of society?” he asked.

“What if society started from the perspective that I do have value? What if people didn’t view me as a burden for others to carry?” Schutten added.

“Look past my wheelchair and see that I am an asset in my community.”

Schutten has been volunteering at his brother’s elementary school since 2014, and at a nursing home in Ancaster since last September, at the invitation of a friend who works there.

“I really enjoy it,” he told LifeSiteNews in an email. “I found that because I’m in a wheelchair the elderly felt they were helping me, not vice versa. An example would be when they play bingo, they all want to help ME with my bingo card.”

Or people will “think they are pushing me to activity but actually I am just driving slow in my power chair,” related Schutten, a member of the Ancaster Canadian Reformed Church.

“In a crazy way I have purpose, and I give them purpose.”

Pieter Harsevoort, who was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy on his first birthday, also spoke to the committee May 3 along with James, and friend André Schutten, ARPA Canada’s director of law and policy and general legal counsel.

Harsevoort, aged 32, told LifeSiteNews in an email that “since Bill C-14 will affect my future I was happy to accept André’s invitation to voice my concerns.”

He added: “In general, I’m concerned with the way the ruling devalues the lives of the disabled and aged, and how any legalization of euthanasia leads to abuse of the most vulnerable members of society.”

A special-ed teacher at a Hamilton Christian school, who described himself on a past blog as “a crooked man on a straight path,” Harsevoort told the committee that Bill C-14 lacks “precision in language” and is “dangerously dependent on euphemisms.”

Bill C-14 uses the term “medically assisted dying” to refer to what is actually “physician assisted suicide,” he said, adding that palliative care is, in fact, medically assisted dying.

“I urge you to please use accurate terminology so that termination of life is not confused with palliative medicine,” he said, noting that the bill requires amendments “to ensure that physicians don’t approve euthanasia for vulnerable persons like James and myself in moments of weakness.”

Bill C-14 allows euthanasia or assisted suicide for competent adults who have a grievous and incurable illness, disease or disability which causes them enduring physical or psychological suffering that is intolerable to them and cannot be relieved under conditions they consider acceptable, who are in an advanced state of irreversible decline, and whose natural death is reasonably foreseeable.

“The reality is that intolerable suffering is relative,” Harsevoort told the committee. “Suffering is modified by many diverse factors.”

He recommended the bill be amended to require the euthanasia and assisted suicide be approved on “reasonable proof” the person meets the eligibility criteria rather than “mere opinion” they do, and eligibility based on a “specific prognosis” rather than on “reasonably foreseeable death.”

And the bill should include specific oversight to ensure people can revoke their request, he told the committee.

While these amendments to the bill  “will improve the situation for the disabled and ill,” Harsevoort said, the “only true protection of the sanctity of life is a ban on euthanasia.”

“Instead of investing money into a bill which normalizes the choice of death, our country should invest time and money into giving people with illness, disabilities, and old age a will to live,” Schutten observed earlier.

“I don’t believe that anyone has the right to choose exactly when to die, but God alone decides,” he told the committee.

“And He does not make mistakes. He has a purpose for everything.”

March for Life 2016

The March for Life, which began in 1974 in Washington, D.C, has inspired a worldwide March for Life movement. Hundreds of thousands have attended these peaceful events, which are a celebration of life, around the globe.

The March for Life, whatever country it is, can be so powerful because often people feel alone. But there is something of the power and the unity, and the solidarity, and in the message that we are going to keep working until every human life is protected from conception until natural death.

Generation LIFE

America’s youth are standing strong for the protection of life at all stages of development. Generation LIFE is fighting for the unborn. Be proud of this great generation that reaches out in love to protect babies.

Offer a prayer in thanksgiving for Generation LIFE and all those participating in the March for Life 2016

 

Safe & Simple Medical Protocol to Reverse RU-486

Priests for Life and the American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists hosted a press conference in Washington, D.C., on Mon. February 23rd to spread the word that a simple and safe medical protocol has been developed that is saving babies whose mothers have taken the first drug of the two-drug procedure known as “RU-486.”

Priests for Life Medical Advisor Dr. Matt Harrison did the first-ever reversal in 2007. The child he saved is now a beautiful and healthy 7-year-old girl.

The video shows Father Frank with Priests for Life Medical Advisor, Dr Matt Harrison and doctors who have saved 127 babies by reversing RU486 abortions. 49 of those babies are still in the womb, and one of them was there with them at the National Press Conference, proving the success of the RU-486 reversal protocol!

For additional information, see Fr. Frank’s article HERE.

“Starve Alzheimer’s Patients” Pushed Again

By Wesley J. Smith
February 8, 2015

The principle that all patients must always receive humane care is under pronounced assault in bioethics, Indeed, some bioethicists now argue that nursing homes should be required to starve Alzheimer’s patients to death–even if they willingly eat, and presumably even if the patient begs for food–if so instructed in an advance medical directive.

1To show you how the culture of death corrupts, spoon feeding isn’t a medical treatment. It is basic humane care–akin to keeping clean, warm, or turning to prevent bed sores. Just as the latter three would never be withheld regardless of an advance directive, neither should food and water!

But suicide pushers now teach people how to kill themselves by starvation, called “voluntary stop eating and drinking” (VSED) in the culture of death trade. So, these bioethicists say that those who aren’t competent to commit VSED, should have the right to have others kill them slowly by refusing to provide them food and waterwhen they are capable of eating and drinking by mouth.

“VSED-by-proxy” is supported increasingly in high places. For the second time (that I know of), a supportive article was published in the prestigious Hastings Center Report. From, “Controlling the End Game of Dementia,” by Paul T. Menzel and M. Colette Chandler-Cramer:

Advance directives to withhold food and water by mouth add an important option not contingent on happening to need life-sustaining treatment. Existing U.S. law does not provide such directives a bright green light, but it provides considerable logical support.

Competent patients already have the legal right to die by stopping eating and drinking, as well as the legal right to direct refusal of treatment in advance, including treatments absolutely necessary for continued life. So if becoming incompetent doesn’t cause someone to lose her rights but only means the rights have to be invoked by a proxy, why should becoming incompetent cause someone to lose the right to die by refusing to eat and drink?

Understand: This is not refusing a feeding tube–which is deemed medical treatment and can be refused by advance directive. Ditto, antibiotics, etc…

Rather, to repeat myself so that the point is sure to sink in–it would force nursing homes and care facilities to starve patients to death who willingly eat and drink!

The advocacy strategy here, of course, is to allow lethal injecting Alzheimer’s patients, e.g., “Why should we be forced to starve these people when we could easily inject them?” The answer is: We shouldn’t starve them! 

The way things are going, the only people allowed in medicine will be those willing to kill. How scary is that?

“A” is for Abortion Clinic Apostle

I recently came across a young woman who is an abortion clinic escort. She asked why someone would stand outside an abortion clinic and preach. She calls him “A.”

>> “A” is a regular and is known for his attempts to connect with clients and companions in his approach of ‘I was just like you. I understand you. I care for you.’ This is “A.”

In this clip below, he is talking to clients and companions waiting by the entrance for the doors to open. (Note: video of minister was changed to audio only by blog owner)


“A” increases his volume after the clients enter the clinic, but his message is always the same. Escorts have heard him so many times, they can recite the story he shares on the sidewalk. ‘I wasted my life until I was 23. Then I read the Bible. My friends said they would find out about Jesus later. One died in a car wreck. He didn’t have time to find out. You never know what is going to happen. You need to find out about Jesus today.’

One of the interesting things about “A” recently is how he speaks about his wife’s pregnancy. When he first started saying, “My baby is 19 weeks old,” we thought he was talking about a born baby. No, he was talking about his wife’s pregnancy. Recently, “A” let us know his baby was 26 weeks old, adding that the baby recently became legally safe from abortion doctors. An escort observed, “I wonder if he thinks that abortion doctors do drive-by abortions and will randomly attempt an abortion if his wife gets too close to a clinic?”

My question is if he cares for the clients and companions so much, why does he speak words meant to shame and harass them for their decision? I know that is a rhetorical question and won’t be answered, but it doesn’t matter if you scream your words or softly speak them. You are still there to interfere with a legal, medical decision by any way you can. <<

I will be referring to this post in an upcoming Part 2 post which will also be one of personal testimony.

We Need to Help Patients Battling Depression, Not Push Them Into Assisted Suicide

Article by Patricia Russo for LifeNews.com.

My concern with the legalization of assisted suicide is the psychological impact on the rest of society. I am writing from my personal experience.

I have dealt with depression for almost 50 of my 63 years. I have been suicidal on numerous occasions and at one point, within the past ten years, I experienced active suicidal ideation for a continuous six-month period almost 24 hours per day. I even carried a knife in my handbag, just waiting for the right moment to stab myself.

When I learned of the assisted suicide story of the Canadian woman who went to Switzerland, I personally heard the message that my life was not worth living. That assisted suicide death gave me the message that when things get really bad and there doesn’t seem to be any hope, I should give up my struggle. Being actively suicidal is often a terminal illness.

I have beehands9n struggling during the past 35 years, in particular, through multiple varieties of therapy and medication and through hospitalizations.

Adults are role models. No amount of denial will change that fact of human nature. Children imitate what they see their parents, teachers, idols and even their peers doing.

I am a parent and I want to show my children that one can grow through the struggle. I watched my own parents leading very unhappy lives and living in an unhappy marriage. They were not good role models for me, but I also understand that they tried their best, in spite of their limitations. My father was diagnosed with a ‘nervous disorder’ in the 1950’s and was treated with barbiturates. Looking back, I can see that he was seriously depressed much of the time and he was unable to work because of his illness. My mother’s depression was never diagnosed, nor acknowledged by anyone, but I saw her endless tears. When one is ill or depressed, one is very often also angry, even if the anger is involuntary, and I witnessed for many years my parents’ anger, especially towards each other. My own depression developed in my early teenage years and I modeled my parents’ anger during the next decades of my life.

I am a role model for my children, even though they are now adults. I have warned them of the strong family history of depression and that they should be alert to its signs and symptoms in themselves, in order to get help early. I want my children to see and believe that life involves struggle, pain, grief, illness and growing old. I need to grow old with dignity and even with joy, just to prove to my children that it is possible to do so. I want them to grieve for me at my natural death. If I were to die by my own hand or with the intentional involvement of someone else, I know that my children would have a much more difficult time not taking their own lives when facing a serious trial in life.


With the prevalence of suicide in our society, especially among the young, how can we endorse this truly devastating role-modeling of assisted suicide? How can we dare to call it anything other than suicide?


The idea of “dying with dignity” is being deliberately presented in a romantic manner to the public, as suggested by the image of a person dying in the arms of a loving spouse. Those who are contemplating suicide are most often very depressed, feeling hopeless, alone, isolated, and often unloved.

When the suicidal thoughts overtake me, I feel completely alone, unable to communicate, I lose any sense of personal identity and I want to scream from the severity of the mental pain.

The image of dying in the arms of one who loves you is very painful to behold by one who is suicidal and feeling unloved, and increases their feelings of worthlessness. If someone wants to die who is loved, how much more does one want to die who is not loved.

Those with serious depression and suicidal tendencies need encouragement to live and grow into healthier attitudes. They do not need societal inducement to give it all up. Unfortunately, they are also usually unable to speak publicly on their own behalf.

Patricia Russo writes for the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition.

March For Life 2015

 

Join Anglicans for Life in Marching for Life

Anglicans for Life and Anglican bishops will be marching in Washington DC and San Francisco, CA in January. Will you?

March for Life – Washington DC – Thursday January 22nd, 2015
12th St, National Mall, Washington DC
Rally: 12:00 Noon
March: 1:00 PM
Silent No More Testimonies at the steps of the Supreme Court after the March

Walk for Life – San Francisco, CA – Saturday January 24th, 2015
Civic Center Plaza
Silent No More Awareness Testimonies – 10:30 AM to 12:15 PM
Rally: 12:30 to 1:30 PM
Walk 1:30 PM

To Join AFL, email Georgette@AnglicansforLife.org or call 412-749-0455.

Keep Life Legal

Today I have a blog recommendation for you – Keep Life Legal, written by Rev. K.H. Marple, and providing pro-life news, commentary and ministry. She has put her finger directly on an issue I believe central to pro-life ministry and support within the Christian Church.

“The Church, as a whole, has been woefully inadequate in getting the Message of Life out. The Church has stood by silently while millions of children have died these past 40 years. The Church typically stands on the excuse that the abortion issue is political. Political? Is it political that innocent children die every day to the tune of at least 4000 per day in the United States?” original text

Rev. Katherine & her “assistant” husband

There Is Such A Thing As A Positive Abortion Story?

A 25-year-old abortion counselor has revealed why she decided to film herself having an abortion.

My response to this young lady – Not so positive if you’re the baby being ripped apart.

Now I spotlight a rebuttal to Emily’s abortion story from the ProLife Society.

Millions Dead

In this shocking video, Life Dynamics Inc., a national pro-life organization located in Denton, Texas compares unborn babies murdered inside American abortion clinics to those killed from American wars.

From 1973 through 2011, at least 55 million unborn children have been slaughtered in the womb in our nation.

Mark Crutcher, president of Life Dynamics in explaining why they created this video said, “We did this video because it’s very easy to talk about 55 million dead babies but no one can fully wrap their minds around those numbers. This will help America understand just how overwhelming these numbers are and demonstrate the magnitude of abortion in the United States.”

To learn more about Life Dynamics and our hard-hitting investigations, visit: http://www.lifedynamics.com

King Baudouin – Champion for Life

King Baudouin – Champion for Life

My other blog is on King Baudouin I of the Belgians and his wife, Queen Fabiola. They were a magnificent couple with deep springs of faith rooted in the Roman Catholic tradition. A recent post I wrote for the Baudouin & Fabiola blog deals with the King’s steadfast belief in the sanctity and value of life.

King Baudouin and Queen Fabiola of the Belgians

King Baudouin and Queen Fabiola of the Belgians

 

An homage

Pope John Paul II with Mother Teresa

Pope John Paul II with Mother Teresa

I don’t think one can start a blog on the importance of respecting life without talking about the two powerhouses for life, Pope John Paul II and Mother Teresa. In my own church family in the Anglican tradition, there are none so eloquent or so unwavering as were those two giants. This first post is in loving memory of John Paul II and Blessed Teresa of Calcutta for their lifetime of work and love and for their shining light. I honor them.